A contemporary social contract: An exploration of enabling factors influencing climate policy intractability in developed nations

Stephen P. Groff*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The social contract has long been used to describe the advantages of individual submission to the body politic. Although a considerable focus has been dedicated to the individual affordances of the social contract, less attention has been paid to the factors that condition individuals' willingness to sacrifice for the collective. For scholars of political science, it is useful to understand the social contract's enabling factors, those conditions which motivate constituent support for public policies and influence citizens' willingness to limit individual freedoms in exchange for greater social security and assurances of collective wellbeing. In this paper, it is theorized that citizens lend their trust to public institutions to enable a social contract. Further, it is hypothesized that individuals who exhibit stronger enabling factors are more likely to contribute to a global conceptualization of the social contract that is committed to international climate policy objectives. Toward that end, an exploratory and descriptive analysis of several existing data sets examines the relationship between the enabling factors of public trust and the outcomes of environmental policy to survey the strength of variable associations that condition support for international climate policy commitments necessary to maintaining a contemporary social contract (CSC).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)721-735
Number of pages15
JournalGlobal Policy
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Durham University and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Research programs

  • ESSB PA

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A contemporary social contract: An exploration of enabling factors influencing climate policy intractability in developed nations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this