A first pregnancy seems associated with a positive effect on the course of inflammatory bowel disease: data from a prospective pregnancy cohort

J. van der Giessen, G. M. Fuhler, C. J. van der Woude*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: The effect of pregnaSSncy on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains controversial. We aimed to describe the disease course before and after a first pregnancy in IBD patients. Methods: We analyzed data from a prospectively followed-up pregnancy cohort (minimal follow-up of 7 years), with clinical, biochemical and endoscopic characteristics obtained pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy and post-pregnancy. Possible factors associated with relapse (disease activity during pregnancy, maternal age, smoking, alcohol use, pre-pregnancy BMI, mode of delivery, thiopurine use during pregnancy, biological use during pregnancy, combination of thiopurine and biological use during pregnancy, breastfeeding, IBD diagnosis, endoscopic scores) were scored. Results: One hundred twenty six patients (95 Crohn’s Disease [CD; 75%] and 31 Ulcerative Colitis/IBD unclassified [UC/IBD-U; 25%]) were enrolled, with one hundred pregnancies occurring in 100 primigravida patients. All pregnancies resulted in live birth. Twenty patients (20%) had a relapse during pregnancy. The median number of relapses/patient/year was 0.25 (IQR 0.5) and 0 (IQR 0.43) respectively before and after pregnancy (p =.00). For CD patients the median relapses/person/year was 0.25 (IQR 0.5) before and 0 (IQR 0.25) after delivery (p =.00), for UC/IBD-U patients there was no significant difference. In the post-partum period more UC patients relapsed compared to CD patients (68% vs 30.7%, p =.01). Seven-year IBD-course was unchanged in the 26 women who did not become pregnant. Conclusion: In this prospective observational cohort study, we found a lower rate of relapses in the 4 years after delivery compared to the 3 years prior to a first pregnancy. Post-partum, more UC patients experienced a relapse compared to CD patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-698
Number of pages6
JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A first pregnancy seems associated with a positive effect on the course of inflammatory bowel disease: data from a prospective pregnancy cohort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this