A Systematic Review of Direct Outputs from the Cerebellum to the Brainstem and Diencephalon in Mammals

Manuele Novello, Laurens W.J. Bosman*, Chris I. De Zeeuw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The cerebellum is involved in many motor, autonomic and cognitive functions, and new tasks that have a cerebellar contribution are discovered on a regular basis. Simultaneously, our insight into the functional compartmentalization of the cerebellum has markedly improved. Additionally, studies on cerebellar output pathways have seen a renaissance due to the development of viral tracing techniques. To create an overview of the current state of our understanding of cerebellar efferents, we undertook a systematic review of all studies on monosynaptic projections from the cerebellum to the brainstem and the diencephalon in mammals. This revealed that important projections from the cerebellum, to the motor nuclei, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia, are predominantly di- or polysynaptic, rather than monosynaptic. Strikingly, most target areas receive cerebellar input from all three cerebellar nuclei, showing a convergence of cerebellar information at the output level. Overall, there appeared to be a large level of agreement between studies on different species as well as on the use of different types of neural tracers, making the emerging picture of the cerebellar output areas a solid one. Finally, we discuss how this cerebellar output network is affected by a range of diseases and syndromes, with also non-cerebellar diseases having impact on cerebellar output areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-239
Number of pages30
JournalCerebellum
Volume23
Issue number1
Early online date28 Dec 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022. corrected publication 2023.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Systematic Review of Direct Outputs from the Cerebellum to the Brainstem and Diencephalon in Mammals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this