Acute phase complications following traumatic spinal cord injury in Dutch level 1 trauma centres

Karin C.M. van Weert, Evert J. Schouten, José Hofstede, Henk van de Meent, Herman R. Holtslag, Rita J.G. van den Berg-Emons

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17 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objective: To assess the number and nature of complications during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury and to explore the relationship between number of complications and length of hospital stay. Design: Multi-centre prospective cohort study. Patients: A total of 54 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, referred to 3 level 1 trauma centres in The Netherlands. Methods: The number and nature of complications were registered weekly from September 2009 to December 2011. Results: A total of 32 patients (59%) had 1 or more medical complications. The most common complications were pressure ulcers (17 patients, 31%) and pulmonary complications (15 patients, 28%). Patients with 3 or 4 complications had significantly (p<0.01) longer hospital stays (58.5 [32.5] days) compared with those with 1 or 2 complications (33.1 [14.8] days) or no complications (21.5 [15.6] days). Conclusion: Complications, particularly pressure ulcers and pulmonary complications, occurred frequently during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury. More complications were associated with longer hospital stays. Despite the existence of protocols, more attention is needed to prevent pressure ulcers during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury for patients in The Netherlands.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)882-885
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume46
Issue number9
Early online date22 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Bibliographical note

© 2014 The Authors

Research programs

  • EMC MUSC-01-46-01

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