Anatomy of the superficial radial nerve and its target nerves for targeted muscle reinnervation: an anatomical cadaver study

Mirte Langeveld, Luca L Bruin, Caroline A Hundepool, Dominic Power, Liron S Duraku, J Michiel Zuidam*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure for treating symptomatic neuroma, in which the neuroma is removed and the proximal nerve stump is coapted to a donor motor branch innervating a nearby muscle. This study aimed to identify optimal motor targets for TMR of the superficial radial nerve (SRN). Methods: Seven cadaveric upper limbs were dissected to describe the course of the SRN in the forearm and motor nerve supply—number, length, diameter, and entry points in muscle of motor branches—for potential recipient muscles. Results: The radial nerve provided three (three of six) motor branches, two (two of six) motor branches, or one (one of six) motor branch to the brachioradialis muscle, entering the muscle 21.7 ± 17.9 to 10.8 ± 15 mm proximal to the lateral epicondyle. One (one of seven), two (three of seven), three (two of seven), or four (one of seven) motor branches innervated the extensor carpi radialis longus muscle, with entry points 13.9 ± 16.2 to 26.3 ± 14.9 mm distal from the lateral epicondyle. In all specimens, the posterior interosseous nerve gave off one motor branch to the extensor carpi radialis brevis, which divided into two or three secondary branches. The distal anterior interosseus nerve was assessed as a potential recipient for TMR coaptation and had a freely transferable length of 56.4 ± 12.7 mm. Conclusions: When considering TMR for neuromas of the SRN in the distal third of the forearm and hand, the distal anterior interosseus nerve is a suitable donor target. For neuromas of the SRN in the proximal two-thirds of the forearm the motor branches to the extensor carpi radialis longus extensor carpi radialis brevis, and brachioradialis are potential donor targets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95E-100E
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume153
Issue number1
Early online date16 May 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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