Associations of social cohesion and socioeconomic status with health behaviours among middle-aged and older chinese people

Zeyun Feng*, Jane M. Cramm, Anna P. Nieboer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: An understanding of factors associated with health behaviours is critical for the design of appropriate health promotion programmes. Important influences of social cohesion, education, and income on people’s health behaviours have been recognised in Western countries. However, little is known about these influences in the older Chinese population. Objective: To investigate associations of social cohesion and socioeconomic status (SES) with health behaviours among middle-aged and older adults in China. Methods: We used data from the World Health Organization’s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health. Logistic regression and multivariate linear regression were performed. Results: Participants who reported greater social cohesion were more likely to have adequate vegetable and fruit (VF) consumption, be socially active, and less likely to smoke daily, but were not physically more active; participants with lower education levels were less likely to have adequate VF consumption and be socially active, and more likely to smoke daily; higher incomes were associated with decreased odds of daily smoking, increased odds of adequate VF consumption, increased likelihood to be socially active, but also less likelihood to have sufficient physical activity (PA). Associations of social cohesion and SES with health behaviours (smoking, PA, and VF consumption) differed between men and women. Discussion: Our findings are an essential step toward a fuller understanding of the roles of social cohesion and SES in protecting healthy behaviours among older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4894
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: ZF is supported by a China Scholarship Council fellowship (grant number: 201708310108; http://www.csc.edu.cn/ accessed on 2 May 2021). This study used data from the World Health Organization’s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health, which is supported by the US National Institute on Aging through interagency agreements (OGHA 04034785, YA1323–08-CN-0020, and Y1-AG-1005-01) and a research grant (R01-AG034479). The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

Funding Information:
ZF is supported by a China Scholarship Council fellowship (grant number: 201708310108; http://www.csc.edu.cn/ accessed on 2 May 2021). This study used data from the World Health Organization?s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health, which is supported by the US National Institute on Aging through interagency agreements (OGHA 04034785, YA1323?08-CN-0020, and Y1-AG-1005-01) and a research grant (R01-AG034479). The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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