Boundary communication: how smartphone use after hours is associated with work-life conflict and organizational identification

W. van Zoonen, A. Sivunen, R.E. Rice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigates how boundary communication mediates the effects of smartphone use for work after hours on work-life conflict and organizational identification. It draws upon boundary theory, work-family border theory, and a structurational view of organizational identification. The research site was a large Scandinavian company operating in the telecommunications industry, with 367 employees responding to a survey at two time periods. In contrast to many studies, the use of information and communication technologies (here, smartphones) for after-hours work was not associated with work-life conflict, but was positively associated with organizational identification. However, communication about family demands with one’s supervisor mediated the relationship between smartphone use and work-life conflict, whereas communication about work demands with family did not. Similarly, the association between smartphone use and organizational identification was positively mediated by communication with one’s supervisor about family demands on work, but not through communication with family about work demands on family.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)372-392
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Applied Communication Research
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Boundary communication: how smartphone use after hours is associated with work-life conflict and organizational identification'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this