Bundles of trust? Examining the relationships between Media repertoires, institutional trust, and social contexts

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Abstract

How the media influence the trust that citizens have in institutions such as politics and science seems more important than ever, given the decline of institutional trust in Western societies, and the increasingly diversified media landscape. This paper focuses on the relationship between media repertoires, institutional trust, and two socializing contexts (parents, social networks). Applying Latent Class Analysis, this paper examines (a) how parental socialization and social networks predict membership of media repertoires, and (b) how repertoires are associated with levels of institutional trust. Outcomes reveal five distinct media repertoires, among which the emerging type of cross-media news consumers. Membership of repertoires is associated with both parental socialization and social networks. There are clear differences in the levels of institutional trust among media repertoires: Popular media omnivores and quality news consumers have the most trust; the non-print-oriented the least.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalCommunications: the European journal of communication research (print)
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 bei den Autorinnen und Autoren, publiziert von De Gruyter. 2023.

Research programs

  • ESHCC M&C

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