CanScreen5, a global repository for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening programs

Li Zhang, Isabel Mosquera, CanScreen5 collaborators, Eric Lucas, Mary Luz Rol, Andre L. Carvalho, Partha Basu*, Daniel Sadowski, Bartlett Natasha, Alison Budd, Ashrafun Nessa, Isabel De Brabander, Annemie Haelens, Sarah Pringels, Jonas Tairo, Solveig Hofvind, J. B. Burrion, Zdravka Valerianova, Jill Tinmouth, Cindy LawSimbi Ebenuwah, Bronwen McCurdy, Beata Janik, George Pupwe, Linn Fenna Groeneveld, Gry Baadstrand Skare, Penelope Layne, Tytti Sarkeala, Mwate Joseph Chaila, Michal Kaminski, Beata Kinel, Jolanta Lissowska, Inga Mumukunde, Vitor Rodrigues, Robinson Rodríguez, Elena Pérez Sanz, Raquel Zubizarreta Alberdi, Guglielmo Ronco, Nataša Antoljak, Dinka Nakić, Davor Plazanin, Andrea Šupe Parun, Mat Goossens, Andrzej Nowakowski, Harry de Koning, Els Dams, Asha Martin, Mara Epermane, Jacques Fracheboud, Esther Toes-Zoutendijk, Heleen M.E. van Agt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

The CanScreen5 project is a global cancer screening data repository that aims to report the status and performance of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening programs using a harmonized set of criteria and indicators. Data collected mainly from the Ministry of Health in each country underwent quality validation and ultimately became publicly available through a Web-based portal. Until September 2022, 84 participating countries reported data for breast (n = 57), cervical (n = 75) or colorectal (n = 51) cancer screening programs in the repository. Substantial heterogeneity was observed regarding program organization and performance. Reported screening coverage ranged from 1.7% (Bangladesh) to 85.5% (England, United Kingdom) for breast cancer, from 2.1% (Côte d’Ivoire) to 86.3% (Sweden) for cervical cancer, and from 0.6% (Hungary) to 64.5% (the Netherlands) for colorectal cancer screening programs. Large variability was observed regarding compliance to further assessment of screening programs and detection rates reported for precancers and cancers. A concern is lack of data to estimate performance indicators across the screening continuum. This underscores the need for programs to incorporate quality assurance protocols supported by robust information systems. Program organization requires improvement in resource-limited settings, where screening is likely to be resource-stratified and tailored to country-specific situations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1135-1145
Number of pages11
JournalNature Medicine
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study is supported by the IARC intramural funding; European Union Public Health Programme (scientific and technical support to the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer and follow-up of the implementation of the Council Recommendation on Cancer Screening); Centre for Global Health Inequalities Research, Norway; American Cancer Society; National Cancer Institute, United States of America; and Medical Research Council, United Kingdom. We acknowledge all advisory board members: S. Kapambwe; S. Al-Homoud; I. Fadhil; Y. L. Qiao; R. Sankaranarayanan; A. Anttila; J. Dillner; T. Andreas Eikemo; H. de Koning; A. Ponti; S. Arrossi; R. Herrero; A. Migowski; R. Murillo; S. Luciani; D. Puricelli Perrin; L. Rabeneck; R. Smith; S. Taplin; E. L. Trimble; and K. Canfell. We acknowledge all members of the scientific committee: Y. Chami Khazraji; Z. M. Chirenje; J. Kwan Jun; K. Saika; S. Sangrajrang; F. Al Tahan; K. Zendehdel; F. Hamers; E. Kantelhardt; C. Senore; M. de Camargo Cancela; C. Ferre; E. Lazcano-Ponce; M. Saraiya; and J. O’Hallahan. We thank K. Guinot, IARC, for her support with infographic refinement, manuscript formatting and submission. Where authors are identified as personnel of IARC/WHO, the authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this article, which do not necessarily represent the decisions, policy or views of IARC/WHO.

Funding Information:
This study is supported by the IARC intramural funding; European Union Public Health Programme (scientific and technical support to the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer and follow-up of the implementation of the Council Recommendation on Cancer Screening); Centre for Global Health Inequalities Research, Norway; American Cancer Society; National Cancer Institute, United States of America; and Medical Research Council, United Kingdom. We acknowledge all advisory board members: S. Kapambwe; S. Al-Homoud; I. Fadhil; Y. L. Qiao; R. Sankaranarayanan; A. Anttila; J. Dillner; T. Andreas Eikemo; H. de Koning; A. Ponti; S. Arrossi; R. Herrero; A. Migowski; R. Murillo; S. Luciani; D. Puricelli Perrin; L. Rabeneck; R. Smith; S. Taplin; E. L. Trimble; and K. Canfell. We acknowledge all members of the scientific committee: Y. Chami Khazraji; Z. M. Chirenje; J. Kwan Jun; K. Saika; S. Sangrajrang; F. Al Tahan; K. Zendehdel; F. Hamers; E. Kantelhardt; C. Senore; M. de Camargo Cancela; C. Ferre; E. Lazcano-Ponce; M. Saraiya; and J. O’Hallahan. We thank K. Guinot, IARC, for her support with infographic refinement, manuscript formatting and submission. Where authors are identified as personnel of IARC/WHO, the authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this article, which do not necessarily represent the decisions, policy or views of IARC/WHO.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, The Author(s).

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