Cardio-metabolic risk factors during childhood in relation to lung function and asthma

Sara M. Mensink-Bout, Susana Santos, Johan C. de Jongste, Vincent W.V. Jaddoe, Liesbeth Duijts*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cardio-metabolic risk factors might have an adverse effect on respiratory outcomes, but associations in children are unknown. We aimed to study the longitudinal associations of cardio-metabolic risk factors with lung function and asthma at school age. We also examined whether any association was explained by child's body mass index (BMI). Methods: In a population-based cohort study among 4988 children, cardio-metabolic risk factors were measured at 6 and 10 years and included blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. At age 10 years, lung function was measured by spirometry and current physician-diagnosed asthma was assessed by questionnaire. Results: After adjustment for confounders, child's BMI, and multiple testing, we observed that a higher diastolic blood pressure at the age of 6 years was associated with a higher forced vital capacity (FVC) at the age of 10 years (Z-score difference (95% CI): 0.05 (0.01, 0.08), per SDS increase in diastolic blood pressure). Also, child's CRP concentrations above the 75th percentile at both ages 6 and 10 years were related to a lower FVC as compared to CRP concentrations below the 75th percentile at both ages (Z-score difference (95% CI) −0.21 (−0.36, −0.06)). No consistent associations of other cardio-metabolic risk factors with respiratory outcomes were observed. Conclusion: Blood pressure and CRP, but not lipids and insulin, were associated with lower lung function but not with asthma. The underlying mechanisms and long-term effects of these associations require further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)945-952
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Allergy and Immunology
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Generation R Study is made possible by financial support from the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development. This project received funding for projects from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (LIFECYCLE, grant agreement No 733206, 2016; EUCAN‐Connect grant agreement No 824989; ATHLETE, grant agreement No 874583). Dr Liesbeth Duijts received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 co‐funded program ERA‐Net on Biomarkers for Nutrition and Health (ERA HDHL) (ALPHABET project (no 696295; 2017), ZonMW, the Netherlands (no 529051014; 2017)). Dr Vincent Jaddoe received support from the European Research Council Consolidator Grant (ERC‐2014‐CoG‐648916). The study sponsors had no role in the study design, data analysis, interpretation of data, or writing of this report.

Funding Information:
The Generation R Study is made possible by financial support from the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development. This project received funding for projects from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (LIFECYCLE, grant agreement No 733206, 2016; EUCAN-Connect grant agreement No 824989; ATHLETE, grant agreement No 874583). Dr Liesbeth Duijts received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 co-funded program ERA-Net on Biomarkers for Nutrition and Health (ERA HDHL) (ALPHABET project (no 696295; 2017), ZonMW, the Netherlands (no 529051014; 2017)). Dr Vincent Jaddoe received support from the European Research Council Consolidator Grant (ERC-2014-CoG-648916). The study sponsors had no role in the study design, data analysis, interpretation of data, or writing of this report. The Generation R Study is conducted by the Erasmus Medical Centre in close collaboration with the School of Law and the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Municipal Health Service, Rotterdam area, and the Stichting Trombosedienst and Artsenlaboratorium Rijnmond (Star-MDC), Rotterdam. We gratefully acknowledge the contribution of children and their parents, general practitioners, hospitals, midwives, and pharmacies in Rotterdam.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology published by European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Research programs

  • EMC MM-04-54-08-A
  • EMC MM-03-54-04-A
  • EMC OR-01-54-02

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cardio-metabolic risk factors during childhood in relation to lung function and asthma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this