Care ideals in the Netherlands: Shifts between 2002 and 2011

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Abstract

Our study’s premise was that normative care beliefs can inform the current care policy debate. We conducted latent class regression analyses on two waves of Netherlands Kinship Panel Study data (n = 4,163) to distinguish care ideals that captured multiple dimensions of normative care beliefs simultaneously. We also assessed how these care ideals have shifted in the early twenty-first century. We distinguished four care ideals: warm-modern (family and state jointly responsible for caring, egalitarian gender roles), cold-modern (large state responsibility, restricted family responsibility, egalitarian gender roles), traditional (restricted state responsibility, large family responsibility, moderately traditional gender roles), and cold-traditional (large state responsibility, restricted family responsibility, traditional gender roles). Between 2002 and 2011, there has been a shift away from warm-modern care ideals and towards cold-modern care ideals. This is remarkable, because Dutch policy makers have increasingly encouraged family members to take on an active role in caring for dependent relatives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-281
Number of pages14
JournalCanadian Journal on Aging-Revue Canadienne du Vieillissement
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2015

Bibliographical note

Acknowledgements
The authors gratefully acknowledge the insightful comments of Niels Schenk and Jeroen van der
Waal. Financial support for this paper comes from the European Research Council “Families in
Context” project (grant agreement No. 324211). The research leading to these results has received
funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant
agreement no. 320116 for the research project FamiliesAndSocieties. The development of an
enterprise like the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study requires investments that clearly surpass the
financial means of individual institutions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support
from the ‘Major Investments Fund’ (grant 480-10-009) and the ‘Longitudinal Survey and Panel
Fund’ (grant 481-08-008) of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Financial
and institutional support for the NKPS also comes from The Netherlands Interdisciplinary
Demographic Institute (NIDI), the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the
Faculty of Social Sciences (Utrecht University), the Faculty of Spatial Sciences (University of
Amsterdam), the Faculty of Social Sciences (Tilburg University), and the Faculty of Social Sciences
(Erasmus University Rotterdam).

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