CBM-I training and its effect on interpretations of intent, facial expressions, attention and aggressive behavior

Nouran AlMoghrabi*, Ingmar H.A. Franken, Birgit Mayer, Menno van der Schoot, Jorg Huijding

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

There is abundant evidence suggesting that attention and interpretation biases are powerful precursors of aggression. However, little is known how these biases may interact with one another in the development and maintenance of aggression. Using cognitive bias modification of interpretation (CBM-I), the present study examined whether training more pro-social or hostile intent attributions would affect attention bias, interpretation bias of facial expressions, aggression and mood. University students (17-48 years) were assigned to either a positive training (n = 40), negative training (n = 40), or control training (n = 40). Results showed that the positive training successfully changed measures of intent attributions in a pro-social direction compared to the control training. The negative training changed measures of intent attributions in a hostile direction but not more so than the control training. We found no generalization of the training effects to relevant other outcomes. Possible explanations underlying these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
Volume17
Edition2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2021

Publication series

SeriesEurope's Journal of Psychology
ISSN1841-0413

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, PsychOpen. All rights reserved.

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