Challenging Behaviour in adults with Intellectual Disability (ChallBe ID-study): combining education and research in the training for physicians for people with Intellectual Disability

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Abstract

Introduction: A new design for scientific research education program was developed for the Dutch specialist training in intellectual disability (ID) medicine. The teaching of research skills is combined with systematic data collection in the care organization in which the trainees perform their training. All trainees collect the same fixed set of data concerning the topic of challenging behaviour and psychiatric illness in adults with ID. We would like to inform you about the composition of this study and the output concerning the different research projects.

Methods: The ChallBe-ID study is an ongoing observational cohort study in which both cross-sectional and longitudinal data is obtained in adults with ID receiving care from the participating care organizations (23 participating organizations).

Results: Baseline data concerning mental and physical health of 669 adults with ID is currently available, and longitudinal for 142 participants. Mean age of the participants was 51.9 yrs (SD 16.1), 60.4% were male. Most of the participants (62.2%) have moderate or severe ID, 30.5% is diagnosed with epilepsy and 26.9% with autism. Examples of research questions will be given.

Implications: With this study a large collection of data is available concerning challenging behavior and (mental) health in a large sample of adults with ID, giving unique opportunities to acquire more knowledge about this major topic in ID medicine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume63
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

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