Citizens in charge? Reviewing the background and value of introducing choice and competition in public services

LG Tummers, SR (Sebastian) Jilke, Steven Walle

Research output: Chapter/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

9 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introducing choice and competition in public services was supposed to put citizens in the “driver’s seat”, making them in charge of their service provision. Introducing choice often is indeed beneficial for citizens. However, it sometimes also leads to increased inequality among citizens. This chapter provides an overview of the background, facilitators and pitfalls of choice, illustrated using empirical studies from various sectors (such as education, healthcare and utilities) in various countries. We conclude by arguing that policymakers should make informed decisions regarding choice. Introducing choice can benefit public services, but one should remain cautious for its potential negative effects.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPublic Administration Reformation: Market Demand from Public Organizations
EditorsY.K. Dwivedi, M.A. Shareef, S.K. Pandey, V. Kumar
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages24-42
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9780415836678
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Publication series

SeriesRoutledge Critical Studies in Public Management

Research programs

  • ESSB PA
  • EUR ESSB 25

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Citizens in charge? Reviewing the background and value of introducing choice and competition in public services'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this