Cloning of the essential myotonic dystrophy region and mapping of the putative defect

Charalampos Aslanidis, Gert Jansen, Chris Amemiya, Gary Shutler, Mani Mahadevan, Catherine Tsilfidis, Chira Chen, Jennifer Alleman, Nicole G.M. Wormskamp, Mark Vooijs, Jessica Buxton, Keith Johnson, Hubertus J.M. Smeets, Gregory G. Lennon, Anthony V. Carrano, Robert G. Korneluk, Bé Wieringa, Pieter J. De Jong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

495 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MYOTONIC dystrophy is a common dominant disorder (global incidence of 1:8,000) with variable onset and a protean nature of symptoms mainly involving progressive muscle wasting, myotonia and cataracts1. To define the molecular defect, we have cloned the essential region of chromosome 19ql3.3, including proximal and distal markers2-7 in a 700-kilobase contig formed by overlapping cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The central part of the contig bridges an area of about 350 kilobases between two new flanking crossover borders4-5. This segment has been extensively characterized through the isolation of five YAC clones and the subsequent subcloning in cosmids from which a detailed EcoRl, HindIII, Mlul and Notl restriction map has been derived. Two genomic probes and two homologous complementary DNA probes were isolated using the cosmids. These probes are all situated within ∼10 kilobases of genomic DNA and detect an unstable genomic segment in myotonic dystrophy patients. The length variation in this segment shows similarities to the instability seen at the fragile X locus8. The physical map location and the genetic characteristics of the length polymorphism is compatible with a direct role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)548-551
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume355
Issue number6360
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Feb 1992
Externally publishedYes

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