Communication training for general practitioners aimed at improving antibiotic prescribing: A controlled before-after study in multicultural Dutch cities

Dominique L.A. Lescure*, Özcan Erdem, Daan Nieboer, Natascha Huijser van Reenen, Aimée M.L. Tjon-A-Tsien, Wilbert van Oorschot, Rob Brouwer, Margreet C. Vos, Alike W. van der Velden, Jan Hendrik Richardus, Hélène A.C.M. Voeten

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction:

Suboptimal doctor-patient communication drives inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics. We evaluated a communication intervention for general practitioners (GPs) in multicultural Dutch cities to improve antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTI).

Methods:

This was a non-randomized controlled before-after study. The study period was pre-intervention November 2019 – April 2020 and post-intervention November 2021 – April 2022. The intervention consisted of a live training (organized between September and November 2021), an E-learning, and patient material on antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in multiple languages. The primary outcome was the absolute number of prescribed antibiotic courses indicated for RTIs per GP; the secondary outcome was all prescribed antibiotics per GP. We compared the post-intervention differences in the mean number of prescribed antibiotics between the intervention (N = 25) and the control group (N = 110) by using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test, while adjusting for the pre-intervention number of prescribed antibiotics. Additionally, intervention GPs rated the training and their knowledge and skills before the intervention and 3 months thereafter.

Results:

There was no statistically significant difference in the mean number of prescribed antibiotics for RTI between the intervention and the control group, nor for mean number of overall prescribed antibiotics. The intervention GPs rated the usefulness of the training for daily practice a 7.3 (on a scale from 1–10) and there was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-intervention on four out of nine items related to knowledge and skills.

Discussion:

There was no change in GPs prescription behavior between the intervention and control group. However, GPs found the intervention useful and showed some improvement on self-rated knowledge and communication skills.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1279704
JournalFrontiers in Medicine
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Communication training for general practitioners aimed at improving antibiotic prescribing: A controlled before-after study in multicultural Dutch cities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this