Compulsory, objective, critical, and pluralistic teaching about religions? Incentives and disincentives under international human rights law

Jeroen Temperman*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

    Abstract

    Within the human rights discipline there seems to be near consensus that non-confessional and non-denominational teaching about religions, including Islam, fosters the promotion of human rights. Most importantly, such teaching may best prepare the pupil, in the terms of the Children’s Rights Convention, for a “responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace, tolerance, equality of sexes, and friendship among all peoples, ethnic, national and religious groups and persons of indigenous origin”. Nevertheless, teaching about religions has not quite taken off. This short comment ventures into some of the intricacies of international human rights law that may serve as explanations in this regard.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIslamic Religious Education in Europe
    Subtitle of host publicationA Comparative Study
    EditorsLeni Franken, Bill Gent
    PublisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis Group)
    Pages287-290
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Electronic)9781000378160
    ISBN (Print)9780367353759
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2021

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2021 Taylor & Francis.

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