Computerized and adaptable tests to measure visuospatial abilities in stem students

Juan C. Castro-Alonso*, Paul Ayres, Fred Paas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter/Conference proceedingConference proceedingAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Performance in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines can depend on the sub-abilities of spatial ability and visuospatial working memory. According to the STEM task, certain sub-abilities may be more important than others in predicting achievement. Similarly, some individual characteristics (e.g., gender) moderate some of these sub-abilities. For example, males on average have higher mental rotation spatial ability than females, whereas spatial working memory tends to be less prone to gender effects. In addition, the results of the tests measuring these sub-abilities can be changed by manipulating certain variables. We present a battery of nine computerized and adaptable instruments to measure these sub-abilities, with the aim of informing cognitive researchers about the processing abilities most vital for undertaking STEM tasks, and how they can be modified to suit learner characteristics.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Human Factors in Training, Education, and Learning Sciences - Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Training, Education, and Learning Sciences, 2017
EditorsTerence Andre
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Italia
Pages337-349
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783319600178
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventAHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Training, Education, and Learning Sciences, 2017 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: 17 Jul 201721 Jul 2017

Publication series

SeriesAdvances in Intelligent Systems and Computing
Volume596
ISSN2194-5357

Conference

ConferenceAHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Training, Education, and Learning Sciences, 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period17/07/1721/07/17

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The first author acknowledges funding from CONICYT PAI, national funding research program for returning researchers from abroad, 2014, No. 82140021; and PIA? CONICYT Basal Funds for Centers of Excellence, Project FB0003. Also, this research was supported by an Australian Research Council grant (DP140103307) to the second and third authors. We acknowledge the programming and design of Daniel Escalante, Mauricio Barrios, Mat?as Salinas and Ignacio Jarabran, and the significant assistance of M?nica Arenas and Claudia Arenas.

Publisher Copyright:
© Springer International Publishing AG 2018.

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