Conservation, extraction and social contracts at a violent frontier: Evidence from eastern DRC’s Itombwe Nature Reserve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Conservation efforts must develop strategies to perform at violent frontiers where environmental values, mineral extraction and conflict intersect. Using war-torn eastern Democratic Republic of Congo's Itombwe Nature Reserve as an illustrative example, this article explores how community conservation is implemented and received at a violent frontier. Taking inspiration from an emerging body of literature which portrays conservation as a form of ‘social contract’ in regions where the nation state is weak or absent, it explores some of the expectations and obligations that surround community conservation initiatives. It draws the conclusion that conservation social contracts are likely to produce unintended consequences when left unfulfilled or broken. Conservation actors perceived to be breaking the terms of (implicit) social contracts can inadvertently encourage local communities to embrace alternative contracts with other actors seeking to extract value from the resources located in frontiers, such as industrial mining companies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102519
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalPolitical Geography
Volume92
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Conservation, extraction and social contracts at a violent frontier: Evidence from eastern DRC’s Itombwe Nature Reserve'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this