Corporate social responsibility, coexistence and contestation: large farms’ changing responsibilities vis-à-vis rural households in Russia

Oane Visser*, Alexander Kurakin, Alexander Nikulin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This article investigates the regionally varied changes in social support and responsibilities of large-scale farms vis-à-vis household plot holders and their rural communities in post-Soviet Russia. Ongoing marketisation puts pressure on the Soviet-inherited symbiosis between large farms and household plots. We observe that large farms’ shift to Anglophone-style, explicit Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) hides declining support for villagers and sometimes even dispossession. In the second of our two case studies, a less well-endowed region, the inherited symbiosis continues with modifications (“implicit CSR”) and helps sustain comparatively higher household plot production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-599
Number of pages20
JournalCanadian Journal of Development Studies
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Work on this article was supported by the Basic Research Program of the National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia); the Federal Ministry of Research and Education of Germany?s programme ?Sustainable Land Management? [grant number 01LL0905H]; and the Russia office of the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, ?Social justice and regional integration in post-Soviet countries? programme; H2020 European Research Council [grant number 313871]. We gratefully acknowledge Meline Khachatryan?s assistance and Robin Smith?s editing.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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