Cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses in xenotransplantation: A PERVerted reality?

Luc J.W. Van Der Laan, Daniel R. Salomon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies of the expression and tropism of pig endogenous retroviruses for many types of cells have provided new insights into the risk for cross-species transmission of infection in xenotransplantation. All pigs contain several copies of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), and at least three variants of PERV can infect human cell lines in culture. A number of retroviruses that are in the same family as PERV produce leukemia and lymphoma in their natural hosts. Certainly the ongoing tragedy of the AIDS pandemic is an example of cross-species infection. There has been an ongoing public debate on the safety of xenotransplantation that considers both the risk to individual patients and the risk to the general public. In this review the authors discuss evidence of PERV release and infection of different primary cells in culture as well as current animal and clinical studies of PERV infection risks in transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-58
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

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