Daily and compulsive internet use and well-being in adolescense: a diathesis-stress model based on big five personality traits

Niels Van der Aa, Geertjan J.M. Overbeek, Rutger C.M.E. Engels, Ron H.J. Scholte, Gert-Jan Meerkerk, Regina J.J.M. Van den Eijnden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the associations between adolescents’ daily Internet use and low well-being (i.e., loneliness, low self-esteem, and depressive moods). We hypothesized that (a) linkages between high levels of daily Internet use and low well-being would be mediated by compulsive Internet use (CIU), and (b) that adolescents with low levels of agreeableness and emotional stability, and high levels of introversion would be more likely to develop CIU and lower well-being. Data were used from a sample of 7888 Dutch adolescents (11–21 years). Results from structural equation modeling analyses showed that daily Internet use was indirectly related to low well-being through CIU. In addition, daily Internet use was found to be more strongly related to CIU in introverted, low-agreeable, and emotionally less-stable adolescents. In turn, again, CIU was more strongly linked to loneliness in introverted, emotionally less-stable, and less agreeable adolescents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)765-776
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume38
Early online date1 Aug 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Research programs

  • EMC OR-01-65-03

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