Design requirements of upper extremity supports for daily use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe muscle weakness

Suzanne J. Filius*, Jaap Harlaar, Lonneke Alberts, Saskia Houwen-van Opstal, Herman van der Kooij, Mariska M. H. P. Janssen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BackgroundPeople with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) cope with progressive muscular weakness and consequential upper extremity function loss. They benefit from arm supports, or arm exoskeletons, to assist arm function. Especially for severe muscle weakness (DMD >= Brooke Scale 4), the design of such arm support is challenging. This study aims to structurally develop functional and technical design requirements of arm supports for people with DMD Brooke Scale 4.MethodsAn overview of clinical characteristics and a classification of clinically meaningful activities were derived from data from the Dutch Dystrophinopathy Database and available literature. Based on these, functional and technical design requirements of arm supports were developed and matched to the achievable needs of the user.ResultsFirst, the clinical characteristics of the target population, such as strength, range of motion, and functional ability, are given. Next, clinically relevant activities of daily living are translated to functional requirements categorised in a 'must,' 'should,' and 'could' category. Last, the technical requirements to realise these functional goals are presented.ConclusionsThe recommendations following from the functional user needs, technical requirements, and safety considerations can be used to make the development of assistive arm supports for people with DMD Brooke Scale 4 more user-centred.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Design requirements of upper extremity supports for daily use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe muscle weakness'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this