Distant relatives? Demographic determinants of long-term developments in intergenerational proximity, The Netherlands 1650–1899

Anita Boele, Charlotte Störmer, Corry Gellatly, Tine De Moor*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate what late timing of marriage combined with neo-locality in early modern Western Europe actually implied for the likelihood of upward intergenerational support. In our analysis of genealogical data from the Netherlands (1650–1899) we show that due to high marriage ages and small spousal age gaps, life cycles of children and their parents were going through difficult periods at the same time, with the elderly as potential victims. To some extent, the risk of ‘hardship’ was compensated for by relatively small geographical distances between the parental and children’s households, allowing for exchange of support. We discuss our outcomes in the broader context of alternative options and elderly care arrangements that were developed from the early modern period onwards.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-387
Number of pages29
JournalHistory of the Family
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

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