Do you approach positive events or do they approach you? Linking event valence and time representations in a Dutch sample

Annemijn C. Loermans, Bjorn B. De Koning, Lydia Krabbendam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In order to think and talk about time, people often use the ego- or time-moving representation. In the ego-moving representation, the self travels through a temporal landscape, leaving past events behind and approaching future events; in the time-moving representation, the self is stationary and temporal events pass by. Several studies contest to the psychological ramifications of these two representations by, inter alia, demonstrating a link between them and event valence. These studies have, however, been limited to English speakers, even though language has been found to affect time representation. The present study therefore replicated Margolies and Crawford's (2008) experiment on event valence and time representation amongst speakers of Dutch. Unlike Margolies and Crawford (2008), we do not find that positive valence leads to the endorsement of an ego-moving statement. Future studies will need to determine the ways through which language might moderate the relation between event valence and time representation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-345
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cognition and Culture
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding
This research was supported by a VICI grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) awarded to Lydia Krabbendam (Grant
No.453-11-005). The funders had no role in study design, data collection, and
analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the article.

Publisher Copyright:
© Loermans, de K oning and Krabbend am, 2021.

Research programs

  • ESSB PSY

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