Dyadic Discrete Choice Experiments Enable Persons with Dementia and Informal Caregivers to Participate in Health Care Decision Making: A Mixed Methods Study

Joost D. Wammes*, Joffre D. Swait, Esther W. De Bekker-Grob, Joan K. Monin, Nanon H.M. Labrie, Janet L. Macneil Vroomen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) may facilitate persons with dementia and informal caregivers to state care preferences. DCEs can be cognitively challenging for persons with dementia. Objective: This study aims to design a dementia friendly dyadic DCE that enables persons with dementia and informal caregivers to provide input individually and jointly, by testing the number of attributes and choice tasks persons with dementia can complete and providing insight in their DCE decision-making process. Methods: This study included three DCE rounds: 1) persons with dementia, 2) informal caregivers, and 3) persons with dementia and informal caregivers together. A flexible DCE design was employed, with increasing choice task complexity to explore cognitive limitations in decision-making. Summary statistics and bivariate comparisons were calculated. A qualitative think-aloud approach was used to gain insight in the DCE decision-making processes. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Fifteen person with dementia, 15 informal caregiver, and 14 dyadic DCEs were conducted. In the individual DCE, persons with dementia completed six choice tasks (median), and 80% could complete a choice task with least three attributes. In the dyadic DCE persons with dementia completed eight choice tasks (median) and could handle slightly more attributes. Qualitative results included themes of core components in DCE decision-making such as: understanding the choice task, attribute and level perception, option attractiveness evaluation, decision rule selection, and preference adaptation. Conclusion: Persons with dementia can use simple DCE designs. The dyadic DCE was promising for dyads to identify overlapping and discrepant care preferences while reaching consensus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-114
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:
This work was supported by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (NWO-ZonMw Veni, 091.619.060).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 - The authors. Published by IOS Press.

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