Early brain magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcome in children with congenital heart disease: A systematic review

Emma I Dijkhuizen, Sophie de Munck*, Rogier C J de Jonge, Karolijn Dulfer, Ingrid M van Beynum, Maayke Hunfeld, André B Rietman, Koen F M Joosten, Neeltje E M van Haren

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

AIM: To investigate the association between early brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and neurodevelopmental outcome (NDO) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD).

METHOD: A search for studies was conducted in Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar. Observational and interventional studies were included, in which patients with CHD underwent surgery before 2 months of age, a brain MRI scan in the first year of life, and neurodevelopmental assessment beyond the age of 1 year.

RESULTS: Eighteen studies were included. Thirteen found an association between either quantitative or qualitative brain metrics and NDO: 5 out of 7 studies showed decreased brain volume was significantly associated with worse NDO, as did 7 out of 10 studies on brain injury. Scanning protocols and neurodevelopmental tests varied strongly.

INTERPRETATION: Reduced brain volume and brain injury in patients with CHD can be associated with impaired NDO, yet standardized scanning protocols and neurodevelopmental assessment are needed to further unravel trajectories of impaired brain development and its effects on outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1572
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume65
Issue number12
Early online date10 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

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