Effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on peripheral B cell differentiation and isotype switching in patients with multiple sclerosis

Stephanie Knippenberg*, Joost Smolders, Mariëlle Thewissen, Evelyn Peelen, Jan Willem Cohen Tervaert, Raymond Hupperts, Jan Damoiseaux

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitamin D has been proposed as a promoter of immune homeostasis in multiple sclerosis (MS). During the past decade, the focus of the effects of vitamin D has been on dendritic cells and on T cells. Since there is an increasing interest in the role of B cells in the pathophysiology of MS, we studied the role of vitamin D on B cells in vivo in patients with MS.Objective: We explored the effects of 12 weeks high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation on peripheral B cell differentiation, immunoglobulin production and levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) in 15 patients with MS.Methods: Circulating B cell subsets were characterized by flow cytometry. Plasma immunoglobulin levels were assessed by nephelometry. Plasma BAFF levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results: Although a significant increase serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was induced, we found no significant shift in B cell differentiation, isotype switching, or plasma BAFF levels.Conclusion: In patients with MS, supplementation of high doses vitamin D3 does not have substantial effects on phenotypic markers of B cell differentiation in circulating B cells. Future studies may unravel more subtle changes in the B cell compartment, either in the circulation or in the central nervous system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1418-1423
Number of pages6
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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