Emergence of antimicrobial resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the intensive care unit: association with the duration of antibiotic exposure and mode of administration

Erlangga Yusuf*, Bruno Van Herendael, Walter Verbrugghe, Margareta Ieven, Emiel Goovaerts, Kristof Bergs, Kristien Wouters, Philippe G. Jorens, Herman Goossens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Antibiotics are frequently used in intensive care units (ICUs), and their use is associated with the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance and the duration of antibiotic exposure or mode of administration in an ICU unit. Methods: A 4-year cohort study of intensive care unit was performed in patients with P. aeruginosa isolates from clinical specimens, initially susceptible to the investigated antibiotics (piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, meropenem and amikacin). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of emergence of resistance were calculated using logistic regression analysis for various exposure periods to antibiotics (1–3, 4–7, 8–15 and >15 days) relative to no exposure with adjustment for age, sex, Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS 3) and length of stay. ORs on the emergence of P. aeruginosa resistance were also calculated for the various modes of administration. Results: Included were 187 patients [mean age 61 years, 69% male, mean SAPS 3 score (SD): 59 (12.3)]. None of the antibiotics investigated showed the emergence of resistance within 1–3 days. Significant meropenem resistance emerged within 8–15 days [OR 79.1 (14.9–421.0)] after antibiotic exposure unlike other antibiotics (>15 days). No difference was observed between intermittent and extended administration of meropenem and between beta-lactam mono- or combined therapy. Conclusions: Use of meropenem was associated with the emergence of resistance as soon as 8 days after exposure to the antibiotic.

Original languageEnglish
Article number72
JournalAnnals of Intensive Care
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes

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© 2017, The Author(s).

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