Ethno-religious identification and support for interreligious violence: A study of Muslim and Christian students in Indonesia and the Philippines

Agnieszka Kanas, P Scheepers, C Sterkens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examines mechanisms and conditions under which ethnoreligious identification is related to support for out-group violence.It uses unique survey data collected among religious minorities and majorities in conflict and non-conflict regions in Indonesia and the Philippines.We find that strong ethno-religious identification is positively related to support for out-group violence.This relationship is fully mediated by the perception of out-group threat, suggesting that ethno-religious identification facilitates the perception of out-group threat, which, in turn, is positively related to support of violence.While the experience of communal violence increases support for interreligious violence, it does not influence the relationship between perceived group threat and support for violence.Interestingly, there is some evidence that the negative influence of intergroup contact on violence support is weaker for those who experienced communal violence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344 - 373
Number of pages30
JournalPolitics and Religion
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021.Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Religion and Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.

Research programs

  • ESSB PA

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