Family history as the strongest predictor of aortic and peripheral aneurysms in patients with intracranial aneurysms

Pui Man Rosalind Lai, Elliot Akama-Garren, Anil Can, Selena Rae Tirado, Victor M. Castro, Dmitriy Dligach, Sean Finan, Vivian S. Gainer, Nancy A. Shadick, Guergana Savova, Shawn N. Murphy, Tianxi Cai, Scott T. Weiss, Rose Du*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective:
Intracranial aneurysms (IA) and aortic aneurysms (AA) are both abnormal dilations of arteries with familial predisposition and have been proposed to share co-prevalence and pathophysiology. Associations of IA and non-aortic peripheral aneurysms are less well-studied. The goal of the study was to understand the patterns of aortic and peripheral (extracranial) aneurysms in patients with IA, and risk factors associated with the development of these aneurysms.

Methods:
4701 patients were included in our retrospective analysis of all patients with intracranial aneurysms at our institution over the past 26 years. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and aneurysmal locations were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to study associations with and without extracranial aneurysms.

Results:
A total of 3.4% of patients (161 of 4701) with IA had at least one extracranial aneurysm. 2.8% had thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms. Age, male sex, hypertension, coronary artery disease, history of ischemic cerebral infarction, connective tissues disease, and family history of extracranial aneurysms in a 1st degree relative were associated with the presence of extracranial aneurysms and a higher number of extracranial aneurysms. In addition, family history of extracranial aneurysms in a second degree relative is associated with the presence of extracranial aneurysms and atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher number of extracranial aneurysms.

Conclusion:
Significant comorbidities are associated with extracranial aneurysms in patients with IA. Family history of extracranial aneurysms has the strongest association and suggests that IA patients with a family history of extracranial aneurysms may benefit from screening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume126
Early online dateJun 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jun 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Elsevier Ltd

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