Foetal tobacco and cannabis exposure, body fat and cardio-metabolic health in childhood

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Abstract

Background: Foetal tobacco and cannabis exposure may have persistent cardio-metabolic consequences in the offspring. Objective: We examined the associations of maternal and paternal tobacco and cannabis use during pregnancy with offspring body fat and cardio-metabolic outcomes. Methods: In a population-based prospective cohort study among 4792 mothers, fathers, and children, we assessed parental substance use by questionnaires. Childhood outcomes included body mass index (BMI), body fat, blood pressure, and lipid, glucose and insulin concentrations at 10 years. Results: Children exposed to maternal tobacco use during pregnancy had a higher android/gynoid fat mass ratio (difference 0.22 SDS, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13, 0.30), fat mass index (difference 0.20 SDS, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.28), triglyceride concentrations (difference 0.15 SDS, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.26), and a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.71), compared to non-exposed. Children exposed to maternal cannabis during pregnancy had a higher BMI (difference 0.26 SDS, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.44), android/gynoid fat mass ratio (difference 0.21 SDS, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.39), and fat-free mass index (difference 0.24 SDS, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.41), compared to non-exposed. The associations for paternal substance use with child cardio-metabolic health outcomes were similar as those for maternal use. Conclusions: Similar associations for maternal and paternal substance use during pregnancy suggest that these findings may be explained by shared family-based social and lifestyle factors, rather than by direct foetal programming.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12863
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric obesity
Volume17
Issue number3
Early online date21 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The general design of the Generation R Study was supported by Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, the Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) and the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport. Vincent W.V. Jaddoe received funding from a Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council (ERC‐2014‐CoG‐648 916). Hanan El Marroun was supported by Stichting Volksbond Rotterdam, the Dutch Brain Foundation (De Hersenstichting, Project Number GH2016.2.01) and the NARSAD Young Investigator Grant from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Grant Number 27853), and the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program (LifeCycle, Grant Agreement 733 206). Kim N. Cajachagua‐Torres was supported by Peruvian Scholarship (547‐2018‐SERVIR). The study sponsors had no role in the study design, analysis and interpretation of data, and writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contribution of parents and their children, general practitioners, hospitals, midwives and pharmacies in Rotterdam.

Funding Information:
Kim N. Cajachagua-Torres was involved conception, study design, data analysis and interpretation, literature research, generation of tables and figures, and writing of the manuscript. Vincent W.V. Jaddoe and Hanan El Marroun were involved in conception, study design, data acquisition, data analysis and interpretation. Irwin K.M. Reiss and Susana Santos were involved in the interpretation of data. All authors critically reviewed the manuscript and had final approval of the submitted version. The general design of the Generation R Study was supported by Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, the Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) and the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport. Vincent W.V. Jaddoe received funding from a Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council (ERC-2014-CoG-648 916). Hanan El Marroun was supported by Stichting Volksbond Rotterdam, the Dutch Brain Foundation (De Hersenstichting, Project Number GH2016.2.01) and the NARSAD Young Investigator Grant from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (Grant Number 27853), and the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program (LifeCycle, Grant Agreement 733 206). Kim N. Cajachagua-Torres was supported by Peruvian Scholarship (547-2018-SERVIR). The study sponsors had no role in the study design, analysis and interpretation of data, and writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contribution of parents and their children, general practitioners, hospitals, midwives and pharmacies in Rotterdam.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

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