Higher preconceptional maternal body mass index is associated with faster early preimplantation embryonic development: the Rotterdam periconception cohort

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Abstract

Background: Overweight and obesity affect millions of people globally, which has also serious implications for reproduction. For example, treatment outcomes after in vitro fertilisation (IVF) are worse in women with a high body mass index (BMI). However, the impact of maternal BMI on embryo quality is inconclusive. Our main aim is to study associations between preconceptional maternal BMI and morphokinetic parameters of preimplantation embryos and predicted implantation potential. In addition, associations with clinical IVF outcomes are investigated. Methods: From a tertiary hospital, 268 women undergoing IVF or IVF with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were included; 143 normal weight, 79 overweight and 46 obese women. The embryos of these women were cultured in the EmbryoScope, a time-lapse incubator. The morphokinetic parameters of preimplantation embryos and predicted implantation potential, assessed by the KIDScore algorithm were longitudinally evaluated as primary and secondary outcomes, respectively. The tertiary outcomes included clinical outcomes, i.e., fertilization, implantation and live birth rate. Results: After adjustment for patient- and treatment-related factors, we demonstrated in 938 embryos that maternal BMI is negatively associated with the moment of pronuclear appearance (βtPNa -0.070 h (95%CI -0.139, -0.001), p = 0.048), pronuclear fading (βtPNf -0.091 h (95%CI -0.180, -0.003), p = 0.043 and the first cell cleavage (βt2 -0.111 h (95%CI -0.205, -0.016), p = 0.022). Maternal BMI was not significantly associated with the KIDScore and tertiary clinical treatment outcomes. In embryos from couples with female or combined factor subfertility, the impact of maternal BMI was even larger (βtPNf -0.170 h (95%CI -0.293, -0.047), p = 0.007; βt2 -0.199 h (95%CI -0.330, -0.067), p = 0.003). Additionally, a detrimental impact of BMI per point increase was observed on the KIDScore (β -0.073 (se 0.028), p = 0.010). Conclusions: Higher maternal BMI is associated with faster early preimplantation development. In couples with female or combined factor subfertility, a higher BMI is associated with a lower implantation potential as predicted by the KIDScore. Likely due to power issues, we did not observe an impact on clinical treatment outcomes. However, an effect of faster preimplantation development on post-implantation development is conceivable, especially since the impact of maternal BMI on pregnancy outcomes has been widely demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number145
Number of pages13
JournalReproductive Biology and Endocrinology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Sept 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding
This research was funded by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of
the Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and
the Erasmus MC Medical Research Advisor Committee’s ‘Health Care Efciency
Research’ program (OZBS72.16080).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

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