How do higher education students regulate their learning with video modeling examples, worked examples, and practice problems?

Milou van Harsel*, Vincent Hoogerheide, Eva Janssen, Peter Verkoeijen, Tamara van Gog

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
28 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Presenting novices with examples and problems is an effective and efficient way to acquire new problem-solving skills. Nowadays, examples and problems are increasingly presented in computer-based learning environments, in which learners often have to self-regulate their learning (i.e., choose what type of task to work on and when). Yet, it is questionable how novices self-regulate their learning from examples and problems, and to what extent their choices match with effective principles from instructional design research. In this study, 147 higher education students had to learn how to solve problems on the trapezoidal rule. During self-regulated learning, they were free to select six tasks from a database of 45 tasks that varied in task format (video examples, worked examples, practice problems), complexity level (level 1, 2, 3), and cover story. Almost all students started with (video) example study at the lowest complexity level. The number of examples selected gradually decreased and task complexity gradually increased during the learning phase. However, examples and lowest level tasks remained relatively popular throughout the entire learning phase. There was no relation between students' total score on how well their behavior matched with the instructional design principles and learning outcomes, mental effort, and motivational variables.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)703-728
Number of pages26
JournalInstructional Science
Volume50
Issue number5
Early online date26 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © 2022, The Author(s).

Research programs

  • ESSB PSY

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