How songs from growing up and viewers' attachment styles affect video ads' effectiveness

Carlos J.S. Lourenço*, Giuliana Isabella, Willem Verbeke, Khoi Vo, Angelika Dimoka, Richard P. Bagozzi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We propose that the positive effect of coming-of-age songs on ad effectiveness arises from a mediation process where the music-evoked interpersonal memories of growing up stored in the brain and their accompanying emotions inevitably play a role, but not so straightforwardly as previously suggested. Rather, their effects work through the heightened familiarity of and peaked preferences for coming-of-age songs. We also propose that these sequentially mediated effects are moderated by viewers' developmental attachment styles. We test and find support for these propositions in three multimethod studies with more than 1200 participants born between the 40s and the mid-70s and almost 60 popular songs released between the 60s and the 2010s. We discuss the implications of our findings, namely for age-segmented video ads, and suggest future research directions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-233
Number of pages25
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are indebted to Ale Smidts (Rotterdam School of Management (RSM), Netherlands, Petr Janata (UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain, US), and Ivo Marcelo (Champalimaud Foundation, Costa Lab, Portugal) for their insightful comments on the fMRI study and are grateful to Bram van den Bergh (RSM), Eduardo B. Andrade (Fundação Getúlio Vargas, Brazil), and Adam Duhacheck (U. of Illinois at Chicago, US) for helpful suggestions regarding the behavioral Study 1. We are also thankful to Priyali Rajogopal, Elise Chandon, Eva Beuchel, Chen Zhou, Satish Jayachandran, and seminar participants at Marketing Department, Darla Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, US, for many helpful comments on an earlier version of the paper. Carlos J.S. Lourenço is supported by FCT, I.P., the Portuguese national funding agency for science, research, and technology, under the Project UIDB/04521/2020. Giuliana Isabella is supported by Insper under the funding number 300165/2020 (contact email: [email protected].).

Funding Information:
We are indebted to Ale Smidts (Rotterdam School of Management (RSM), Netherlands, Petr Janata (UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain, US), and Ivo Marcelo (Champalimaud Foundation, Costa Lab, Portugal) for their insightful comments on the fMRI study and are grateful to Bram van den Bergh (RSM), Eduardo B. Andrade (Fundação Getúlio Vargas, Brazil), and Adam Duhacheck (U. of Illinois at Chicago, US) for helpful suggestions regarding the behavioral Study 1. We are also thankful to Priyali Rajogopal, Elise Chandon, Eva Beuchel, Chen Zhou, Satish Jayachandran, and seminar participants at Marketing Department, Darla Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, US, for many helpful comments on an earlier version of the paper. Carlos J.S. Lourenço is supported by FCT, I.P., the Portuguese national funding agency for science, research, and technology, under the Project UIDB/04521/2020. Giuliana Isabella is supported by Insper under the funding number 300165/2020 (contact email: [email protected] .).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Psychology & Marketing published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.

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