How to Present a Decision Object in Health Preference Research: Attributes and Levels, the Decision Model, and the Descriptive Framework

Axel C. Mühlbacher*, Esther W. de Bekker-Grob, Oliver Rivero-Arias, Bennett Levitan, Caroline Vass

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademic

5 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In health preference research (HPR) studies, data are generated by participants’/subjects’ decisions. When developing an HPR study, it is therefore important to have a clear understanding of the components of a decision and how those components stimulate participant behavior. To obtain valid and reliable results, study designers must sufficiently describe the decision model and its components. HPR studies require a detailed examination of the decision criteria, detailed documentation of the descriptive framework, and specification of hypotheses. The objects that stimulate subjects’ decisions in HPR studies are defined by attributes and attribute levels. Any limitations in the identification and presentation of attributes and levels can negatively affect preference elicitation, the quality of the HPR data, and study results. This practical guide shows how to link the HPR question to an underlying decision model. It covers how to (1) construct a descriptive framework that presents relevant characteristics of a decision object and (2) specify the research hypotheses. The paper outlines steps and available methods to achieve all this, including the methods’ advantages and limitations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPatient
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

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© The Author(s) 2024.

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