Institutional Trust and Social Media Use in Citizen-State Relations: Results from an international cross country vignette study

Research output: Chapter/Conference proceedingConference proceedingAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this article is to identify whether trust affects citizens' use of social media to initiate conversations with government on social media platforms. Using a vignette survey, we gathered data from the Canada, Greece, the Netherlands and Paraguay. Multivariate analysis showed that controlling for demographics and individual-level adoption factors, trust in government does not impact citizens' use of social media to initiate conversations about public issues, but trust in social media business and organizational infrastructure is (both in democratic countries as well as in flawed democracies). These results highlight how trust in institutions affect citizens' engagement and digital participation, and identifies conditions under which social media platforms may contribute to a vibrant democracy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research
Subtitle of host publicationIntelligent Technologies, Governments and Citizens, DGO 2022
EditorsLoni Hagen, Mihkel Solvak, Sungsoo Hwang
PublisherACM
Pages118-128
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781450397490
ISBN (Print)978-145039749-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are grateful for the comments and suggestions we received from the reviewers and from participants in workshops in which previous versions of this article were presented. This work was supported by European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 857622 “ERA Chair in E-Governance and Digital Public Services—ECePS.”

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 ACM.

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