Insufficient pain relief after surgical neuroma treatment: Prognostic factors and central sensitisation

Annemieke Stokvis, JH Coert, Han van Neck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Treatment of patients with neuromatous pain is difficult. Numerous treatment methods have been described, but none has been completely effective in providing sufficient pain relief. Patient-specific prognostic factors, predicting pain after surgical neuroma treatment, can help clinicians in the process of patient treatment and care. Methods: A computerised bibliographical database (PubMed Medline) was searched for articles concerning prognostic factors predicting the outcome of surgical neuroma treatment, and all the reference lists were checked. Results: Evidence for predicting the outcome was found for neuromas of the radial sensory branch and digital nerves, discrete nerve syndrome, workers compensation, employment status, litigation involvement, duration of pain and number of previous operations. Psychosocial problems are often found in neuroma patients. In chronic neuropathic pain patients, changes in the central nervous system at the level of spinal cord and in the somatosensory cortex can be found. Conclusions: Neuromas of the radial sensory branch and digital nerves, discrete nerve syndrome, workers' compensation, employment status, litigation involvement, duration of pain and number of previous operations appear to predict the amount of pain after neuroma surgery. However, in a minority of patients, a bad outcome cannot be explained by these factors; in these patients, central sensitisation and psychosocial factors may play a role in maintaining pain. Research focussing on prognostic factors and the central changes induced by painful peripheral injury can lead to new and improved clinical treatment algorithms for the relief and prevention of chronic neuropathic pain. (C) 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)1538-1543
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery
Volume63
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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