Intranasal Dexmedetomidine as Sedative for Medical Imaging in Young Children: A Systematic Review to Provide a Roadmap for an Evidence-Guided Clinical Protocol

Kato Hermans, Larissa Ramaekers, Jaan Toelen, Koen Vanhonsebrouck, Karel Allegaert*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
34 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There is an increasing need for effective anxiety and pain reduction during medical imaging procedures in children, addressed by non-pharmacological or pharmacological approaches. Dexmedetomidine is a fairly recently marketed, selective α2-adrenergic agonist that can be administered intranasally. To develop an evidence-guided clinical protocol, we investigated the (side) effects, preconditions and safety aspects following intranasal dexmedetomidine administration in children (1 month–5 years) for procedural sedation during medical imaging. To this end, a systematic search (PubMed, Embase and CINAHL (12/2021)) was performed to identify studies on intranasal dexmedetomidine for procedural sedation for medical imaging (computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). Following screening and quality assessment, eight studies were retained. Nasal nebulization was considered the best administration method, dosing varied between 2 and 4 µg/kg (age-dependent) 30–45 min prior to imaging and contraindications or restrictions with respect to oral intake were somewhat consistent across studies. Valid sedation scores and monitoring of vital signs were routinely used to assess sedation and the need for rescue dosing (different approaches), whereas discharge was generally based on Aldrete score (score ≥ 9). Heart rate, blood pressure and saturation were routinely monitored, with commonly observed bradycardia or hypotension (decrease by 20%). Based on these findings, a roadmap for evidence-guided clinical protocol was generated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1310
Number of pages10
JournalChildren
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

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© 2022 by the authors.

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