Knowledge activation after information encoding: Implications of trait priming on person judgment

D Lerouge, DHRV Smeesters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is widely assumed that traits primed after the encoding of person information do not lead to assimilation effects on the judgment of that person. The authors challenge this view by providing evidence that post-encoding trait primes can result in assimilative person judgments under certain conditions. In Experiments 1 and 2, we identify the conditions under which these assimilation effects occur. Experiment 1 shows the importance of participants’ goals during person information encoding: assimilation is observed when person information is encoded as part of a memorization goal (as opposed to an impression formation goal). The findings of Experiment 2 further reveal that the encoded person information should imply trait concepts rather than being merely vague with respect to the primed trait category. Finally, the results of Experiment 3 suggest that the obtained assimilation effect is driven by differential accessibility for prime-congruent person information.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-436
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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