Lessons learned from conducting a randomized controlled trial to improve non-adherence to antihypertensive drug treatment

L. E. J. Peeters*, T. van Gelder, L. van Dijk, B. C. P. Koch, J. Versmissen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Hypertension significantly contributes to cardiovascular diseases and premature deaths. Effective treatment is crucial to reduce cardiovascular risks, but poor adherence to antihypertensive drugs is a major issue. Numerous studies attempted to investigate interventions for identifying non-adherence, but often failed to address the issue effectively. The RHYME-RCT trial sought to bridge this gap by measuring non-adherence by determining antihypertensive drug concentrations in blood through a dried blood spot (DBS) method in patients with resistant hypertension. This measurement was followed by personalized feedback to improve adherence. During the course of this trial several challenges emerged, including selection bias, the gatekeeper role of physicians, the Hawthorne effect and the role of randomization.Aim: This communication aims to inform fellow researchers and clinicians of challenges that can arise when conducting clinical trials to improve adherence and offer insights for refining study designs to avoid these issues in forthcoming adherence studies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2281316
Number of pages3
JournalBlood Pressure
Volume32
Issue number1
Early online date27 Nov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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