Lower complexity and higher variability in beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure are associated with elevated long-term risk of dementia: The Rotterdam Study

Yuan Ma, Junhong Zhou, Maryam Kavousi, Lewis A. Lipsitz, Francesco Mattace-Raso, Berend E. Westerhof, Frank J. Wolters, Julia W. Wu, Brad Manor, M. Kamran Ikram, Jaap Goudsmit, Albert Hofman*, M. Arfan Ikram

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We hypothesized that subclinical disruption in blood pressure (BP) dynamics, captured by lower complexity and higher variability, may contribute to dementia risk, above and beyond BP levels. Methods: This prospective cohort study followed 1835 older adults from 1997 to 2016, with BP complexity quantified by sample entropy and BP variability quantified by coefficient of variation using beat-to-beat BP measured at baseline. Results: Three hundred thirty-four participants developed dementia over 20 years. Reduced systolic BP (SBP) complexity was associated with a higher risk of dementia (hazard ratio [HR] comparing extreme quintiles: 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-2.20). Higher SBP variability was also associated with a higher risk of dementia (HR comparing extreme quintiles: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.11-2.22. These findings were observed after adjusting for age, sex, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, mean SBP, and other confounding factors. Discussions: Our findings suggest that lower complexity and higher variability of beat-to-beat SBP are potential novel risk factors or biomarkers for dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1134-1144
Number of pages11
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2021

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