Malocclusion complexity and orthodontic treatment need in children with autism spectrum disorder

Stephanie A. Meuffels, Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman, Stephen T.H. Tjoa, Clarissa C. Bonifacio, Paola L. Carvajal Monroy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the malocclusion complexity and orthodontic treatment need among children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) referred for orthodontic treatment by quantifying the Discrepancy Index (DI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Materials and methods: Dental records of 48 ASD and 49 non-ASD consecutive patients aged between 9 and 18 years (median age 13.0 years) referred for orthodontic treatment were reviewed and compared. The Discrepancy Index (DI) was quantified to determine the malocclusion complexity, and the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), including the Dental Health Component (IOTN-DHC) and Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC), was quantified to determine the orthodontic treatment need. Statistical analysis included descriptive analysis, Pearson chi-square tests, Fisher’s exact test, Mann–Whitney U tests, and several univariate and multivariate regression analyses. The statistical analysis used descriptive analysis, Pearson chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and multivariate logistic regression. Results: The results show that both malocclusion complexity (DI, p = 0.0010) and orthodontic treatment need (IOTN-DHC, p = 0.0025; IOTN-AC p = 0.0009) were significantly higher in children with ASD. Furthermore, children with ASD had a higher prevalence of increased overjet (p =.0016) and overbite (p =.031). Conclusions: Malocclusion complexity and orthodontic treatment need are statistically significantly higher among children with ASD than children without ASD, independent of age and sex. Clinical relevance: Children with autism may benefit from visits to a dental specialist (orthodontist) to prevent, to some extent, developing malocclusions from an early age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6265-6273
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Oral Investigations
Volume26
Issue number10
Early online date15 Jun 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

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