Maternal Body Mass Index, Early-Pregnancy Metabolite Profile, and Birthweight

Rama J. Wahab, Vincent W.V. Jaddoe, Ellis Voerman, George J.G. Ruijter, Janine F. Felix, Linda Marchioro, Olaf Uhl, Engy Shokry, Berthold Koletzko, Romy Gaillard*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Context: Maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) has a strong influence on gestational metabolism, but detailed metabolic alterations are unknown. Objective: First, to examine the associations of maternal prepregnancy BMI with maternal early-pregnancy metabolite alterations. Second, to identify an early-pregnancy metabolite profile associated with birthweight in women with a higher prepregnancy BMI that improved prediction of birthweight compared to glucose and lipid concentrations. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prepregnancy BMI was obtained in a subgroup of 682 Dutch pregnant women from the Generation R prospective cohort study. Main Outcome Measures: Maternal nonfasting targeted amino acids, nonesterified fatty acid, phospholipid, and carnitine concentrations measured in blood serum at mean gestational age of 12.8 weeks. Birthweight was obtained from medical records. Results: A higher prepregnancy BMI was associated with 72 altered amino acids, nonesterified fatty acid, phospholipid and carnitine concentrations, and 6 metabolite ratios reflecting Krebs cycle, inflammatory, oxidative stress, and lipid metabolic processes (P-valuesâ <â 0.05). Using penalized regression models, a metabolite profile was selected including 15 metabolites and 4 metabolite ratios based on its association with birthweight in addition to prepregnancy BMI. The adjusted R2 of birthweight was 6.1% for prepregnancy BMI alone, 6.2% after addition of glucose and lipid concentrations, and 12.9% after addition of the metabolite profile. Conclusions: A higher maternal prepregnancy BMI was associated with altered maternal early-pregnancy amino acids, nonesterified fatty acids, phospholipids, and carnitines. Using these metabolites, we identified a maternal metabolite profile that improved prediction of birthweight in women with a higher prepregnancy BMI compared to glucose and lipid concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E315-E327
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume107
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal Body Mass Index, Early-Pregnancy Metabolite Profile, and Birthweight'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this