Measuring parent–adolescent interactions in natural habitats: The potential, status, and challenges of ecological momentary assessment

Loes Keijsers*, Savannah Boele, Anne Bülow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Few people are as important for an adolescent's development as their parents. However, most research on parent–adolescent relationships describes long-term population-wide effects. Therefore, little is known about everyday interactions between adolescents and parents in individual families. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) measures families several times a day as they go through daily life. This approach provides ecologically valid insights into which interactions took place and how they were experienced. State-of-the-art EMA studies suggest that within-family fluctuations in parenting may trigger changes in an adolescent's well-being and behaviors. In practice, moreover, EMA may strengthen family support and intervention research. This article reviews recent empirical work, highlights the (un)used theoretical and practical promise of EMA and identifies key-challenges to unlock this full potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)264-269
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume44
Early online date9 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work is part of the research program ADAPT financed by the Dutch Research Council (NWO-452-17-011). The funder had no involvement in the study.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s)

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