Nicorandil-induced changes in the distribution of cardiac output and coronary blood flow in pigs

Pieter D. Verdouw, Loes M.A. Sassen, Dirk J. Duncker, Ilona O. Schmeets, Rob J. Rensen, Pramod R. Saxena

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21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present investigation was conducted to study systemic and regional haemodynamic effects of nicorandil, a potent coronary vasodilator, after intravenous or local intracoronary administration in anaesthetized or conscious pigs. Intravenous infusions of nicorandil for 10 min in both anaesthetized (15, 30, 75 and 150 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) and conscious (20, 40 and 80 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) pigs reduced arterial blood pressure, stroke volume, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and systemic vascular resistance, but increased heart rate and maxLVdP/dt. Since nicorandil decreased LVEDP at doses which did not affect arterial blood pressure, the drug may be considered as a more potent venodilator than arterial dilator. Nicorandil increased cardiac output only in conscious animals due to a more marked tachycardia (85% after 80 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) than in anaesthetized animals (30% after 75 micrograms.kg-1.min-1). The nicorandil-induced increase in heart rate and maxLVdP/dt, being substantially attenuated in conscious pigs after treatment with propranolol, can be ascribed to a reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system following the fall in arterial pressure. Although cardiac output did not change in anaesthetized animals, intravenous infusions of nicorandil did cause a redistribution of blood flow in favour of organs such as the heart, adrenals, spleen, small intestine and brain at the expense of that to the stomach and kidneys; hepatic artery and skeletal muscle blood flow did not change. The increase in myocardial blood flow, primarily to the subepicardial layers, was associated with an enhancement in coronary venous oxygen content and was also notices after intracoronary infusions of nicorandil (0.6, 1.5, 3 and 6 micrograms.kg-1.min-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-8
Number of pages7
JournalNaunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology
Volume336
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 1987

Bibliographical note

Copyright Springer-Verlag 1987

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