No improvement in survival of older women with cervical cancer—A nationwide study

Hans H.B. Wenzel*, Ruud L.M. Bekkers, Valery E.P.P. Lemmens, Maaike A. Van der Aa, Hans W. Nijman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study aims to report trends in primary treatment and survival in cervical cancer (CC) to identify opportunities to improve clinical practice and disease outcome. Methods: Patients diagnosed with CC between 1989 and 2018 were identified from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (N = 21,644). Trends in primary treatment and 5-year relative survival were analysed with the Cochran-Armitage trend test and multivariable Poisson regression, respectively. Results: In early CC, surgery remains the preferred treatment for ages 15–74. Overall, it was applied more often in younger than in older patients (92% in 15–44; 64% in 65–74). For 75+, surgery use was stable over time (38%–41%, p=0.368), while administration of radiotherapy decreased (57%–29%, p < 0.001). In locally advanced CC, chemoradiation use increased over time (5%–65%, p < 0.001). It was applied least often for 75+, in which radiotherapy remains most common (54% in 2014–2018). In metastatic CC, chemotherapy use increased over time (11%–28%, p < 0.001), but varied across age groups (6%–40% in 2014–2018). In patients treated with primary chemoradiation, regardless of stage, brachytherapy use increased over time (p ≤ 0.001). Full cohort 5-year survival increased from 68% to 74% (relative excess risk 0.55; 95% confidence interval [0.50–0.62]). Increases were most significant in locally advanced CC (38%–60%; 0.55 [0.47–0.65]). Survival remained stable in 75+ (38%–34%; 0.82 [0.66–1.02]). Conclusion: Relative survival for cervical cancer increased over the last three decades. The proportion of older patients receiving preferred treatment lags behind. Consequently, survival did not improve in the oldest patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-167
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume151
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2021

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