One-year Mortality of Cancer Patients with an Unplanned ICU Admission: A Cohort Analysis Between 2008 and 2017 in the Netherlands

Esther N. van der Zee*, Fabian Termorshuizen, Dominique D. Benoit, Nicolette F. de Keizer, Jan Bakker, Erwin J.O. Kompanje, Wim J.R. Rietdijk, Jelle L. Epker

*Corresponding author for this work

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11 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Introduction: A decrease in short-term mortality of critically ill cancer patients with an unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission has been described. Few studies describe a change over time of 1-year mortality. Therefore, we examined the 1-year mortality of cancer patients (hematological or solid) with an unplanned ICU admission and we described whether the mortality changed over time. Methods: We used the National Intensive Care Evaluation (NICE) registry and extracted all patients with an unplanned ICU admission in the Netherlands between 2008 and 2017. The primary outcome was 1-year mortality, analyzed with a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazard regression. We compared the 1-year mortality of cancer patients to that of patients without cancer. Furthermore, we examined changes in mortality over the study period. Results: We included 470,305 patients: 10,401 with hematological cancer, 35,920 with solid cancer, and 423,984 without cancer. The 1-year mortality rates were 60.1%, 46.2%, and 28.3% respectively (P<.01). Approximately 30% of the cancer patients surviving their hospital admission died within 1 year, this was 12% in patients without cancer. In hematological patients, 1-year mortality decreased between 2008 and 2011, after which it stabilized. In solid cancer patients, inspection showed neither an increasing nor decreasing trend over the inclusion period. For patients without cancer, 1-year mortality decreased between 2008 and 2013, after which it stabilized. A clear decrease in hospital mortality was seen within all three groups. Conclusion: The 1-year mortality of cancer patients with an unplanned ICU admission (hematological and solid) was higher than that of patients without cancer. About one-third of the cancer patients surviving their hospital admission died within 1 year after ICU admission. We found a decrease in 1-year mortality until 2011 in hematology patients and no decrease in solid cancer patients. Our results suggest that for many cancer patients, an unplanned ICU admission is still a way to recover from critical illness, and it does not necessarily lead to success in long-term survival. The underlying type of malignancy is an important factor for long-term outcomes in patients recovering from critical illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1165-1173
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Intensive Care Medicine
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

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© The Author(s) 2021.

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