Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy in sciatica: a randomized controlled trial

Patrick Brouwer, R Brand, ME van Marle, WCH Jacobs, B Schenk, AA van den Berg-Huijsmans, Bart Koes, MA van Buchem, MP Arts, WC Peul

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45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) is a minimally invasive treatment for lumbar disc herniation, with Food and Drug Administration approval since 1991. However, no randomized trial comparing PLDD to conventional treatment has been performed. PURPOSE: In this trial, we assessed the effectiveness of a strategy of PLDD as compared with conventional surgery. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This randomized prospective trial with a noninferiority design was carried out in two academic and six teaching hospitals in the Netherlands according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. PATIENT SAMPLE: One hundred fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analog scores for back and leg pain, and the patient's report of perceived recovery. METHODS: Patients were randomly allocated to PLDD (n=57) or conventional surgery (n=58). Blinding was impossible because of the nature of the interventions. This study was funded by the Healthcare Insurance Board of the Netherlands. RESULTS: The primary outcome, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, showed noninferiority of PLDD at 8 (-0.1; [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.3 to 2.1]) and 52 weeks (-1.1; 95% CI, -3.4 to 1.1) compared with conventional surgery. There was, however, a higher speed of recovery in favor of conventional surgery (hazard ratio, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.42-0.97]). The number of reoperations was significantly less in the conventional surgery group (38% vs. 16%). Overall, a strategy of PLDD, with delayed surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: At 1 year, a strategy of PLDD, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes compared with surgery. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)857-865
Number of pages9
JournalThe Spine Journal
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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