Persistence of long-term COVID-19 sequelae in patients with cancer: An analysis from the OnCovid registry

Alessio Cortellini*, Ramon Salazar, On Covid study group, Alessandra Gennari, Juan Aguilar-Company, Mark Bower, Alexia Bertuzzi, Joan Brunet, Matteo Lambertini, Clara Maluquer, Paolo Pedrazzoli, Alvin JX Lee, MCarmen C. Carmona-García, Thomas Newsom-Davis, Mieke Van Hemelrijck, Andrea Plaja, Alberto Zambelli, Carlo Tondini, Daniele Generali, Rossella BertulliNikolaos Diamantis, Uma Mukherjee, Gianpiero Rizzo, Tamara Yu, Federica Zoratto, Riccardo Bruna, Anna Sureda, Clara Martinez-Vila, Luca Cantini, Francesca Mazzoni, Federica Grosso, Alessandro Parisi, Maristella Saponara, Aleix Prat, David J. Pinato

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction: A significant proportion of patients with cancer who recover from Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) may experience COVID-19 sequelae in the early post-infection phase, which negatively affect their continuity of care and oncological outcome. The long-term prevalence and clinical impact of the post-COVID-19 syndrome in patients with cancer are largely unknown. Methods: In this study, we describe the time course of COVID-19 sequelae in patients with non-advanced cancers enrolled in the OnCovid registry. Results: Overall, 186 patients were included, with a median observation period of 9.9 months (95%CI:8,8–11.3) post-COVID-19 resolution. After a median interval of 2.3 months post-COVID-19 (interquartile range: 1.4–3.7), 31 patients (16.6%) reported ≥1 sequelae, including respiratory complications (14, 7.6%), fatigue (13, 7.1%), neuro-cognitive sequelae (7, 3.8%). The vast majority of the patients were not vaccinated prior to COVID-19. COVID-19-related sequelae persisted in 9.8% and 8% of patients 6 and 12 months after COVID-19 resolution. Persistence of sequelae at first oncological follow-up was associated with history of complicated COVID-19 (45.2% vs 24.8%, p = 0.0223), irrespective of oncological features at COVID-19 diagnosis. Conclusion: This study confirms for the first time that, in a largely unvaccinated population, post-COVID-19 syndrome can affect a significant proportion of patients with non-advanced cancer who recovered from the acute illness. COVID-19 sequelae may persist up to 12 months in some patients, highlighting the need for dedicated prevention and supportive strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume170
Early online date25 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
OnCovid is sponsored by Imperial College London and received direct project funding and infrastructural support from the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. Neither sponsor nor the funders of the study had any role in study design, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report. All authors had access to all the data reported in the study.OnCovid received direct project funding and infrastructural support by the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). Alessio Cortellini is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). David J Pinato is supported by grant funding from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Fund (PS3416) and from the Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro (AIRC MFAG Grant ID 25697) and acknowledges support by the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), the Imperial Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) and the Imperial College Tissue Bank. A. Gennari is supported by the AIRC IG Grant, No. 14230, Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro Foundation, Milan, Italy. A. Gennari from the University of Piemonte Orientale (Novara, Italy) acknowledge support from the UPO Aging Project.

Funding Information:
Lorenza Rimassa received consulting fees from Servier, Amgen, ArQule, AstraZeneca, Basilea, Bayer, BMS, Celgene, Eisai, Exelixis, Genenta, Hengrui, Incyte, Ipsen, IQVIA, Lilly, MSD, Nerviano Medical Sciences, Roche, Sanofi, Zymeworks; lecture fees from AbbVie, Amgen, Bayer, Eisai, Gilead, Incyte, Ipsen, Lilly, Merck Serono, Roche, Sanofi; travel expenses from Ipsen; and institutional research funding from Agios, ARMO BioSciences, AstraZeneca, BeiGene, Eisai, Exelixis, Fibrogen, Incyte, Ipsen, Lilly, MSD, Nerviano Medical Sciences, Roche, Zymeworks.

Funding Information:
Alessio Cortellini is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).

Funding Information:
A. Gennari is supported by the AIRC IG Grant, No. 14230 , Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro Foundation, Milan, Italy. A. Gennari from the University of Piemonte Orientale (Novara, Italy) acknowledge support from the UPO Aging Project.

Funding Information:
David J Pinato is supported by grant funding from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Fund ( PS3416 ) and from the Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro (AIRC MFAG Grant ID 25697) and acknowledges support by the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), the Imperial Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) and the Imperial College Tissue Bank.

Funding Information:
Aleix Prat has declared personal honoraria from Pfizer, Roche, MSD Oncology, Eli Lilly, and Daiichi Sankyo; travel, accommodations and expenses paid by Daiichi Sankyo; research funding from Roche and Novartis; and consulting/advisory role for NanoString Technologies, Amgen, Roche, Novartis, Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Ltd

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